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required on all firearm purchases instead of the fractions of sales that get done today. 408% of u.s. gun sales are by private sellers who are not required to perform background checks. you can be a three-time convicted felon, a serial domestic abuser, severely mentally ill, or even on a terrorist watch list and still go to a gun show or go on the internet and buy whatever gun you want. the american people want to strengthen their bases to prevent the mentally ill from buying gun. but over a million disqualifying mental health records are still missing from states. 10 states have failed to flag a single person as mentally ill. and 17 states list less than 100 people. miles per hour people want to see assault weapons bans reinstated and large capacity ammunition clps banned to keep dangerous ammunition out of the hands of mad men. let's face it. when you put a 30-round clip in an assault weapon, you are not protecting your home. you are not hunting deer, you are hunting people. we have hid from this fight for too long. for too long we have used politics and the second amendment to cover up
is exported all around the world. they want the u.s. economy to be stronger as quickly as possible, because it means there will be able to continue to export. as much as they're trying to move from an export driven economy to a more domestic consumption based economy, they will still rely heavily on exports. the more americans are working, the more money they have in their pockets, the more they will be shopping in stores, and so much of what they buy is made from many other countries, including china. the healthier the u.s. economy is, the more that china will export. that means jobs for the chinese people. >> when you talk to leaders, how much are they actually were it about united states? -- worried about united states? >> i think united states is incredibly important to china, and recognize that. not only in very practical ways, but in another way, more psychological. there is a 150 year history were china has been trying to check itself up in big shin itself upr status. there is this lingering psychological mindset of china being victimized by the great powers. it is kind of a struggle
will push for stronger gun control laws. question for you is and should u.s. gun laws change? here are the numbers to call -- you can also find us online. send us a tweet or join the conversation on facebook, or send us an e-mail. our question for you is whether u.s. gun laws should change? here's the headline in "usa today" -- jumping down into the story, it says -- others are exploring the question of gun laws. we will hear some comments from members of congress this morning. congressional democrats are vowing to push for stricter gun control laws. several democratic lawmakers called yesterday for a new push for gun restrictions, including a ban on military-style assault weapons in the wake of the connecticut massacre. democratic senator dianne feinstein is the author of an assault weapons ban that lapsed in 2004. she said she would introduce new legislation soon. senator dick durbin said that lawmakers will hold hearings on gun-control and several others said they would devote attention to the issue. president obama says action is needed. "ere's the store in "usa today -- and th
minutes that legislators have been mentioned and people have mentioned various talk show host. u.s. a call at 202-585-3881 for republicans -- give us a call. 202-585-3880 for democrats. you can send us a tweet, twitter.com/cspanwj. facebook, as well, facebook.com/cspan. journal@c-span.org. this is lee in wyoming. host: give us a call and let us know who your political hero is. the story after the new ttown shooting. this is the front page of "the new york times." host: the story goes on. this is luke rosak. host: it goes on to talk about that story. front page of "the new york daily news." this stemming from upstate new york about a sniper that set fire to a building and goes on to shoot two firemen as they were trying to take care of the fire. eric from pittsburgh, pennsylvania on the democrat's line. good morning. caller: michael moore. host: i'm sorry? caller: michael moore. capitalism is dead. host: george, good morning. caller: good morning. george will. he is not an office holder and has no intention of running for public office. he gave a lecture in st. louis on december 4 and it wa
: they began receiving funds. as a result the number of pediatricians in the u.s. has grown steadily. today over 40% of the pediatricians and pediatric specialists are trained in the 57 free-standing children's hospitals that receive this funding. a proven track record. we need to get it done and again i congratulate the members on the floor today for getting this bill to hopefully to the president's desk before the year is out. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: thank you, madam speaker. i'd like to yield now to the gentlewoman from california who's the democratic sponsor of the house national pediatric research network act of 2012, which is the second title of the legislation before us, mrs. capps. the speaker pro tempore: for how much time does the gentleman yield? mr. pallone: such time as she may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. mrs. capps: i want to acknowledge being in the chair as my friend. madam speaker, i rise in strong support of the preemie re
the necessary paperwork. he talked to u.s. customs and verified with them that the gun did not violate any mexican law. the two allegedly handed the mexican officials the paperwork regarding the rifle, but instead of continuing on their way to costa rica to go surfing, hammer was immediately detavend, dragged away to -- detained, dragged away to a notorious jail in matamoros, mexico, where they jail narcoterrorists. this is a picture of the marine when he served america. this is a picture recently taken in the matamoros prison. as you can see he's in solitary confinement and like back in the old days chained to his bed because so he won't go anywhere all because of a mixup of what the law is and what should have happened to him at the border. so he's being held as a criminal because the size of the barrel of that rifle was apparently too long. even though u.s. customs told him he was not violating any mexican or american law in having the rifle. hammer had no criminal intent when he took that old rifle into mexico. john hammer should not have to spend another holiday away from his family.
legislation he's sponsoring which will allow more highly skilled immigrants the u.s. that's live at 7:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> i think riders institute is something that's important within the culture. we are a culture of words of voices. words are key to our imagination, our capacity to envision things. we ourselves are not completely tied to print on the page of writing but i think that there is no other art form so readily accessible other than perhaps film. but there is something in literature that cap chures the hunal spirit. >> this weekend join book tv as we look tpwhind scenes at the literary life of new york's capital city albany. >> senators from new york and new jersey say hurricane sandy caused $5 billion worth of damage to rail subway and port infrastructure in their state. they testified on surface transportation yesterday. >> i call this hearing to order. thank you for joining us, mr. secretary. i asked you to testify today because i'm deeply concerned about the recent report that the f.h.a. could potentially need taxpayer support for the first time in its 78-year histo
against the u.s. skimping on care. host: this from sasha -- guest: that is one proposal that gets floated by democrats. medicare part d bargains for drugs. i do not know -- i do not think it would be a cure all, the one proposal that would fix everything. democrats think it would reduce the cost of medicare. host: is there a plan b? guest: we have seen them as the january 1 deadline before and get 30-day extensions. at some point they were working without an extension. medicare told doctors to hold off on submitting your claims for a little bit. that is a situation we have ended up in before. if we're talking months, we're talking about big pay cuts for medicare doctors. that would be uncharted territory. host: joe from arizona on the republican line. caller: good morning. if we look at it logically, sarah is on the right track. we have become a society with honesty as a technicality. you can get more money but you break the law. our society -- you need to stop your people on the show, politicians and say, i asked you a question and you didn't answer it. this is why the doctors in medicar
to derail the long-term solvency of the u.s. i'm proud of the work of our committee that identified $100 billion in savings over the next decade and accomplished it in a sensible manner. we say enough is enough to the slush funds tucked into obamacare, slush funds we discovered through aggressive oversight to blank checks given to h.h.s. we make commonsense changes to medicaid that will put important programs on firmer ground. we eliminate the maintenance effort requirement and impeding state's ability to implement program measures and weakens the safety net by making it more difficult for state to target resources to the most vulnerable americans. we achieve significant savings in something that was noticebly absent in the president's health care law, that being tort reform. the president declared in his 2011 state of the union message, he said this, i'm willing to look at other ideas to bring down costs including one that republicans suggested, medical malpractice reform to rein frivolous lawsuits. now is the time for the president to fulfill that pledge and put doctors, patients and t
, december 16, 2012. the flag over the u.s. capitol, over the white house, and in many locations across the country are at half staff today because of friday's school shooting in newtown, conn.. the nation's newspapers are full of details about what happened on friday. we would like to hear from you your opinions on how america can prevent mass shootings. is it the role of government or society to stop them? here are the numbers to call. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. you can also find us online. send us a tweet, twitter.com/c- spanwj. or join the conversation on facebook by looking for c-span and weighing in. you can also e mail us, journal@c-span.org. here is the first page -- front page of "the hartford current" this morning. "day of grieving." the top headline, along with a list of the victims. the employees, all women. the children, all around the age of 67. this is "the sunday bulletin." "residents gather to find comfort and pray." national newspapers also digging into this story. "the new york times" says that the peopl
didn'tou deal with the sequester earlier in i said, you mean like back in may when the u.s. house paed the only sequester replacement bill to be passed in this town. back in may. they said maybe that takes care of the sequester problem. think said what about the tax rates? i said what about in august new york a bipartisan way, we passed a bill, in this house, to extend current tax rates, to prevent tax rates from going up. i took another question from up with of the folks who said, but what about that senate bill people keep talking about? what about the senate bl? why won't that get a vote in the house. i said actually quite unusual in the rules committee you don't see it often but rules committee waived all the points of order, took all the roadblocks out of the way, in an unprecedented way to allow what we called the levin amendment, which was basically exactly the plan the president has been pushing, to raise toongs family-owned businesses, to punish job creator well, took that vote on the house floor. i'm proud to say that again in a bipartisan way republicans and democrats came t
as he has in the u.s. army. to have risen like he did from private to lieutenant colonel, to run as many missions as he did as a helicopter pilot in vietnam, and to have won the -- two distinguished flying crosses is something that this nation can never say thank you enough for what leonard boswell has done, even before he came to the halls of the u.s. congress. in the real world leonard boswell has truled combined a mid wern farmer's common sense with practical everyday living. it's been that experience that's proven so invaluable to us on the transportation and infrastructure committee. his work to draft critical legislation as a pilot leonard boswell knows very well the tremendous issues facing our aviation community. he served on that subcommittee on aviation for each of his 16 years in this body. during the hearings and markups, leonard often spoke about the critical importance of aviation safety and is an advocate for his fellow general aviation pilots. it was for that reason that leonard received an appointment to the conference committee that wrote the f.a.a. bill that we passed
. >> we have four minutes left. with regard to the state of the u.s. economy, you have some important votes cast before the lame-duck session is over. what is your level of confidence about the future of the u.s. economy right now? >> i am not really optimistic. i think that we have a short- term solution. the president wants to spend more money. i understand that. he also wants to raise taxes on people over $250,000 and he will get part of that. he will have a bill that says we have to give everyone a tax cut, who will vote against that? he has the ability to wait. that is number one. we are trillions of dollars in the hole. not just $16 trillion but $60 trillion or $70 trillion. this will come back to haunt us. we will have a severe economic problem. i hope i am wrong. i hope there is a solution. unless something radical changes, we will see a severe economic problems and high inflation. >> you made the decision not to run again. what will you miss most about congress? >> i will miss the camaraderie. i was one of the founders of the republican study committee which started with four
children, but not out of 10 under privilege women in the u.s. lack supplies. many of these families are third-generation of the entitlement recipients in communities across america. in chicago's cook county, it costs $10 million a month to support them. some reports say next year, one half of all children in new york city will be bored to indigent parents. host: your point in all this? caller: my point is, the money that is being spent on these other entitlement programs have to be cut because these people are able to get out of work and make a nice living, whereas the elderly cannot. guest: i think the main thing to pay it to do about the federal budget -- and this is something that people say flippantly some times. at the u.s. government is an insurance company with an army. when we talk about the insurance company part, we are talking about medicare and social security, and to some degree medicaid. those are programs that benefit the middle class and the poor, mainly through retirement. the other thing that people talk about, those are very small parts in the federal budget compa
and by the u.s. and international maritime industry. we have done a good part of the job. i think we met our responsibility. i am pleased that we are here to authorize for a period of two years the united states coast guard. its operations and its programs, and support the men and women who support us. with that i urge the passage of h.r. 2838, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from washington. mr. larsen: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. larsen: i rise in support of the resolution introduced by my colleague from new jersey and chairman of the subcommittee, mr. lobiondo. before i begin my remarks, i want to join mr. mica and of course many others in offering my condolences to the entire coast guard family for the tragic loss of one of their shape mates during a drug interdiction operation in the waters off of southern california this past weekend. we all recognize that the service men and women of the coast guard willingly and ro
, it pays $285, a u.s. just put $200 ridicule in your truck. he spent $36 one-way on a bridge, $18 through the tunnel, next year it goes up to $48 for the bridge. $24 for the fort mchenry tunnel. i mean, nothing leaves nothing. it's getting out of hand. it used to be a pretty good deal to be a truck driver. now i am not so sure anymore. i just don't know what the next step is. . -- 2013 tax deal is scary me a little. host: -- that is just a portion of what is in the new york times this morning. next is mary in sun city, california. go ahead. we are listening. caller: i am in the rental business in california. i hear california is very big on welfare and section 8. i see there are so many programs where somebody gets to stay home and the government will pay a three-bedroom rent and they only pay $14 a month. they stay home for 10 years, 15 years, or whatever simply because they have children. being in the military, a lot of my friends, the parents work. but these people are not in the military and they get medical, they get food stamps, they get wic. there's never a change in the programs t
are dealing with the u.s. and federal government, you get everything that comes along with that. the paperwork is just awful, if you start with the mayor, they can make things happen. as soon as you get to the federal government. this has been going on for a long time. >> i just want to make it perfectly clear, it is a lot better than 9/11. we were working with 12,000 businesses directly impacted by that disaster in new york. today is a cakewalk in all honesty. i can't think of a situation where we did not help every small business at that point of perfection. there is going to be a lot of businesses needing help and we are struggling with that. we are trying to come up with the resources. the request for the 60 billion, it does include the ability to extend this effort. it will not be a one-year or two-year situation. they probably won't come back for five years. >> i will conclude with this. i agree that this recovery is not going to take place unless the small businesses recover. congress is not going to help small business in one regard, but small businesses and individuals will keep their
, the debate over the assault weapon ban and the testimony of one of the victims in the u.s. "the new york times"had this sense bowl and poignant photograph -- from our twitter page -- al joins us on the phone from new york. caller: good morning. with freedom comes great responsibility. owning a gun is a demonstration of freedom but also requires that you demonstrate responsibility for owning that weapon. i am a gun owner and i was a soldier at one time and i know what bullet can do to flesh and bone. as possibly an option, i think perhaps, like you drive a car, you have to have insurance to drive that car to protect yourself and others. perhaps we should have gun owners by a particular policy that protected from any accidents that happen. also, i think perhaps to get a gun, you need to have some kind of psychological profiling. the military does it and i was in, they call the day 201 file and to purchase the weapon, not just a background check, but have documentation that you have been counseled and you are fit to own a weapon. as far as the high-capacity magazines, no need for it. if you
a factory in china and sell cars. they can delay paying u.s. taxes on that indefinitely. but the money comes from the rent, as so-called passive income, they have to pay taxes on that immediately. this provision says if your a bank -- you can be late paying your taxes. it is going to be considered active income. it is quite valuable to them. it is kind of a gray area. in 1986 when they did big tax reform, they said that is active income and we should tax that money. host: we have been talking with sam goldfarb from cq roll call. thank you very much. >> explores the history and literary culture of all money -- of albany. tonight on c-span, a senate debate on the fiscal cliff. shaun donovan discusses it. harry reid and mitch mcconnell when back-and-forth on fiscal cliff issues and a proposal to raise the debt ceiling. here is part of their exchange. >> yesterday afternoon, i came to the floor and offered president obama's proposal on the fiscal cliff to show that neither he nor democrats in congress are acting in good faith in these negotiations. with just a few weeks ago before a potentially
of pennsylvania. his research includes the u.s. economy, tax policy, and the stock market. he is previously a senior economist at the board of governors at the federal reserve system. he went to that graduate school of business at columbia university. he has worked for both the george w. bush and clinton administrations. both of you went to the same university. i'm sure you can agree on everything today. dr. zandi first. >> thank you for the opportunity. it is an honor to be here with kevin, a good friend of mine. let me say that these are my own personal views. lawmakers have to resolve three issues -- first, the fiscal cliff. second, raising the treasury debt ceiling, which as you know is becoming an issue rarely soon. third, achieving long-term fiscal sustainability. that is deficit reduction and tax increases and spending cuts that allow the gdp ratio to stabilize by the end of the decade. these three things need to be done now. in terms of the fiscal cliff, if policy is unchanged and we go over the cliff and there is still no change after that, the gdp in 2013 will 3.5 percentage point
amount of people. the u.s. military considers the weather as a weapon. i will leave it at that. there is intense stuff, i went to antarctica and it looked like a nuclear bomb had gone off over most of the ice. huge chunks of ice falling off but you do not hear that in the news. i know we have to wrap up. >> thank you. [applause] >> the house is in recess, expected to vote on three pieces of legislation including the intelligence policy bill for next year. no votes are scheduled tonight on the so-called fiscal cliff trade without any action by both chambers of congress, billions of dollars of tax increases and spending cuts are scheduled to officially begin tomorrow. while we wait for the house to come back into session, more from the economist magazine forum. this is on technological innovations and how they might change medical care in the coming year. >> thank you. i have the pleasure of talking about health care in 2013. 2013 is to be a big year for health care. there is an enormous amount of exciting research in global health and personalized madison. at the same time, the
, the u.s. capital -- capitol, america, your congress is in session and we're here to work. yet my republican colleagues refuse to bring up the middle class tax cut bill that is right behind me at this desk. now my colleague from texas can continue to talk about what happened in august of this year. you know, staging votes for the election, that took place. i know the results of the election. when our constituents are concerned -- what our constituents are concerned about is what happens in january, if and when we fail to do our work here now. and also, to expose that the vote that took place in august was a vote to continue the bush era tax cuts. the very same tax cuts that got us into the mess we are in right now. and they're doing that because they're holding hostage the 98% of americans who receive a tax cut under mr. walz's bill before -- that's at the desk today. and they're holding them hostage to make sure that the 2%, the wealthiest 2% don't get that tax cut. our economy is 70% driven by con -- is consumer driven. that means we -- when the middle class spends more, we all
and the accountability review board. the u.s. house of representatives committee on foreign affairs will hold a hearing on thursday, december 20 on the benghazi attacke. secretary clinton will be testifying. c-span will cover this on thursday at 1:00 p.m. eastern time. c-span cameras will be there. front page of the national journal this morning -- on tuesday he delivered the gop talking points about the need for more spending cuts as part of any deal, while downplaying the role of raising income-tax rates on wealthier earners, which the white house trumpets often. boosting rates on the rich, he said, would provide enough money to run the government for eight days. that has nothing to do with spending, getting spending in line. other than performing requisite task, mitch mcconnell has not emerged as a huge presence in the ongoing fiscal cliff narrative. that is a change from past budget and tax deals where his finger prints were evident, a fact that could affect the final outcome or subtlety of the deal. that the national journal reporting. paul is an independent in enterprise, alabama. go ahead. calle
said, i think the more important question to ask is why the u.s. relies on student loans at all. >> student loans are cheaper than grants. >> i don't know and which direction he meant this, but the conversation earlier, talking about the public good of education, if they are defunding the state and city institutions and having to provide more loans, would that be another solution set you could have a free college experience? >> haunt you just have to have $200 billion to spend on it. where is the money going to come from? families, but only one source that maybe has the kind of money >> is a funding priority. their articles written about this, but health care increases, fuel costs, and prisons have become a much higher priority than education. i am not saying it as a right priority, gosh i think this is the heart of the matter. he talked about working at a public university, 73% by the state or whatever and you advance arguments for why education should be funded and, so people actually have a social contract, what do find are effective and what arguments are ineffective? >> i a
. discretionary turns out to be the easier nut to crack because that money doesn't go out the door unless this u.s. house of representatives acts. that distinguishes it, mr. speaker, from mandatory spending. that's the third set of columns on my chart. mandatory spending, as i said, 2/3 of our budget, 68.3% to be precise, and of all the sequestration cuts, 63.8% of the budget is only going to bear 14.4% of the pain. the back story there, mr. speaker, is that's the only 14.4% of the pain. as i said discretionary spending has been on the chopping block in 2011, 2012, and now again in 2013. but mandatory spending we haven't had a single agreement about, and i don't hear the white house talking about it, either. the white house put together a group it was called the simpson-bowles commission. it was named afterers kin bowles, a former clinton chief of staff, and alan simpson, former republican senator. and they came together and what the president called his deficit reduction commission to give the president and -- an idea what we could do to get our fiscal house in order. i want to show in you this c
the house, but i remain proud of our bipartisan effort for which the u.s.a. today called us the brave 38. and i believe this type of thoughtful independent leadership that this is the type of leadership that the 10th district deserves. i also believe that the courage and leadership shown by the house to take on the difficult, but necessary position of reining entitlement spending deserves recognition. we know that medicare stands out as a primary driver of our debt in the future. and unfortunately, this future is not so far off. with one of medicare's key programs scheduled to go bankrupt in the next 10 to 12 years, sustaining the status quo means dramatic cuts down the road on the vulnerable americans who need the program the most, crippling increases to the debt and most likely both. instead, i believe we have a generational obligation to ensure that our children's potential is not crossed by a debt burden borne out of the inability to govern responsebly. medicare reform requires broad bipartisan support so we are not there yet. we are not. i do want to express my appreciation to democ
. and the formula for paying doctors under medicare. later, how the u.s. population is expected to change or the next 50 years. jennifer, a demographer, and william, a demographer for the brookings institution. live starting at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the white house was very controversial. the person who designed washington city, there was competition. he submitted a design for a palace. americans were not having a palace. it was not particularly are inspiring. a european diplomat told the congress it was neither large nor of inspiring. but the answer. the congressman dave said, the building served a purpose. if it were larger and more elegant, perhaps some president would be inclined to become a permanent resident. >> vicki goldberg has gathered a few of her favorite photos in the president's home and photographs and history. watch at 7:30 on american history tv. john boehner's office described a meeting with president obama as a frank talk. he spoke to reporters about fiscal cliff negotiations, criticizing president obama for not being serious on cutting spending and lending he
from a week in brazil. the u.s. would have just grown faster than brazil in the most recent quarter, 2.4%. i raise this because you go down there and talk to business people about why it is. we could have made little more taxes here and a little more regulation there and cost of labor there and a fair amount of uncertainty about what we'll do in the future. they have taken the steam out of it. this is a fragile and requires government to facilitate rather than layer cost and uncertainty on top of it. with that uncertainty and a very aggressive regulatory agenda which has caused uncertainty around health care costs. you add that up and you have a period in which american business is operating under a huge weight. government rates the conditions where businesses and scientists can have the freedom to get the work done. that is an important thing to think about. government can create the conditions under which the cost is listed to allow businesses to innovate. >> if i could follow up. i thought this was amazing. u.s. firms spend 36% to comply with regulation than larger firms. the small
. studies show parents want affluent children, but not out of 10 under privilege women in the u.s. lack supplies. many of these families are third-generation of the entitlement recipients in communities across america. in chicago's cook county, it costs $10 million a month to support them. some reports say next year, one half of all children in new york city will be bored to indigent parents. host: your point in all this? caller: my point is, the money that is being spent on these other entitlement programs have to be cut because these people are able to get out of work and make a nice living, whereas the elderly cannot. guest: i think the main thing to pay it to do about the federal budget -- and this is something that people say flippantly some times. at the u.s. government is an insurance company with an army. when we talk about the insurance company part, we are talking about medicare and social security, and to some degree medicaid. those are programs that benefit the middle class and the poor, mainly through retirement. the other thing that people talk about, those are very small
. they are professionals and patriots. they serve in places where there is little or no u.s. presence. i trust them with my life. it is important to recognize that our colleagues and across the department at home and abroad get it right list times for years on end on some of the top the circumstances imaginable. he cannot lose sight of that. -- we cannot lose sight of that. we have to do better. be open to our colleagues who lost their lives in benghazi. -- we owe it to our colleagues who lost their lives in benghazi. thousands of our colleagues are serving america in diplomatic posts around the world. we will never forget every act of terrorism and we'll never stop working to make things better and safer. the united states will keep leading and engaging around the world, including in those hard places where america's interests -- thank you very much. >> mr. chairman, senator lugar, members of the committee, i also want to thank you for this opportunity. all of us have a responsibility to provide the men and women who have served this country with the best possible security and support. the supervisors hav
. this will create thousands of u.s. jobs in the hardest-hit industries on jobs that cannot be of course using materials that are 90% made in the usa energy efficiency is unique in that it creates its own cash flow. it pays for itself. there are significant barriers that prevent this from being harvested more efficiency -- more efficiently. one is to begin -- and this is akin to building power plants. we know how to finance power plants. they supply predictable amounts of energy and utility can easily raise capital. however we lack the same capital for energy efficiency even notice understood to be the most cost-effective resource for meeting our needs. the energy efficiency efforts equate to a resource greater than any other source in the country. greater than nuclear, natural gas or coal. this is a great example policy that can move the -- this provides incentive to home owners to increase -- the greater the incentive, i the savings. transitioning allows for business model metrology and creates a system to reward innovation. the good news this the systems will need to make this economically
and innovation can benefit the u.s. economy. speakers include white house national economic counsellor sperling and former congresswoman and burned mobile vice-president susan molinari. it starts 10:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. also tomorrow, a look at how u.s. debt, slow economic growth and the retirement of baby boomers could impact the global and economic future of the united states. from the american enterprise institute doug join us live at 5:30 p.m. eastern also here on c-span. >> we are at the new york state museum. this is our galley that is dedicated to the history of september 11 and the attacks at the world trade center. we decided with the gallery to tell the story for the first moments of the attacks using objects from the world trade center site. this is a piece of steel from the south tower. we put it in a place where the public can and should come and touch it. it gives it a real tangible experience. this is a piece of steel from the north towers. this is a dramatically bent piece of steel. this is within 10 floors of the impact of 9/11 on the north tower. again, you can see
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